The Resource CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, April 2003

CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, April 2003

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CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, April 2003
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CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, April 2003
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Summary
This poll, conducted April 11-13, 2003, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his overall job performance, his handling of military action against Iraq, his expectations and priorities for the military action, and his handling of the economy. Respondents were asked whether Bush was paying as much attention to the economy as to the war in Iraq, whether he was respected by other foreign leaders, whether his administration had a clear plan concerning the war in Iraq, and whether his administration leaned toward military solutions when dealing with international crises and events. Respondents were also asked to rate the national economic situation, to provide their opinions on whether the economy was improving, and to comment on whether they kept track of world events. Respondents were queried on the most important issue facing the United States, whether the country was headed in a positive direction, whether they thought relations with European countries were better or worse compared to two years ago, whether they thought relations with non-European countries were better or worse compared to two years ago, which party (Democratic or Republican) was better at handling issues concerning the military, the economy, and terrorism, and whether they or an immediate family member had been or was currently a member of the United States military. Other questions focused on the policy of taking military action against a country that may pose a threat to the United States but has not taken any action yet, the involvement of the United States in changing foreign dictatorships, the appropriate role of the United States in international conflicts, whether North Korea was a threat to the United States, and whether any country posed a serious threat to the United States. Opinions were elicited on the effects of military action in Iraq, whether respondents approved of military action in Iraq, whether they felt the potential benefits were worth the possible costs of military and civilian casualties, how they viewed Iraq before the war, whether Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction, why no weapons of mass destruction had been found, whether not finding weapons of mass destruction and/or Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein meant the United States did not win the war, whether Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was alive, whether Saddam Hussein was involved in the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, whether the United States government correctly assessed the amount of resistance the military would encounter from the Iraqi army, whether the number of casualties experienced by the United States military and Iraqi civilians were within expectations, how they viewed the short-term future of Iraq, and whether the United States was providing adequate humanitarian aid to the Iraqi citizens. Respondents were queried for their opinions on the impact of removing Saddam Hussein from power in the Middle East, whether the war against Iraq would bring democracy to the Middle East, the impact of the war against Iraq on the image of the United States in the Arab world, expectations of how long the United States military would be in Iraq, the extent of responsibility the United States had in Iraq, who was winning the war against terrorism, whether the Iraqi citizens were resentful toward the United States or happy that Saddam Hussein was removed from power, whether the war against Iraq was part of the war on terrorism, whether the war against Iraq would increase the threat of terrorism against the United States, and whether success in Iraq would increase the likelihood that the United States military would be sent to intervene in North Korea, Syria, or Iran. Background variables include, age, sex, political orientation,political ideology, marital status, religious orientation, education, ethnicity, family income in 2002, whether the respondent voted in the 2000 United States presidential election, and if so, for whom they voted
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  • CBS News
  • Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor]
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The New York Times
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CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, April 2003
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Publication
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  • 2003-04
  • 3823
Control code
ICPSR03823.v3
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Access restricted to subscribing institutions
Label
CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, April 2003
Publication
Note
  • 2003-04
  • 3823
Control code
ICPSR03823.v3
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institutions

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