The Resource Effects of Community Policing on Tasks of Street-Level Police Officers in Ohio, 1981 and 1996

Effects of Community Policing on Tasks of Street-Level Police Officers in Ohio, 1981 and 1996

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Effects of Community Policing on Tasks of Street-Level Police Officers in Ohio, 1981 and 1996
Title
Effects of Community Policing on Tasks of Street-Level Police Officers in Ohio, 1981 and 1996
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Summary
These data were collected to analyze the impact of community-oriented policing (COP) on job assignments of police officers in Ohio. The study compared the self-reported job tasks of police officers in 1981 to those in 1996 to determine if job tasks had changed over time, if they differed between officers in departments pursuing community policing, or if they differed between officers assigned as "community policing" officers and those having more traditional assignments. The 1981 Ohio Peace Officer Task Analysis Survey was conducted to measure police officer tasks. A total of 1,989 police officers from over 300 Ohio police agencies responded to that survey. Recognizing that community policing had not yet begun to enjoy popularity when the first sample of officers was questioned in 1981 and that the job of policing and the training needs of peace officers had changed over the past 15 years, the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services again conducted a task analysis survey of a sample of police officers throughout the state in 1996. The 1996 survey instrument included 23 items taken directly from the earlier survey. These 23 items are the only variables from the 1981 survey that are included in this dataset, and they form the basis of the study's comparisons. A total of 1,689 officers from 229 police departments responded to the 1996 survey. Additionally, while the 1996 Peace Officer Task Analysis survey was in the field, the local police agencies included in the survey sample were asked to complete a separate agency survey to determine if they had a community policing program. A total of 180 departments returned responses to this agency survey. Background questions for the 1981 and 1996 task analysis surveys included police officers' age, race, sex, and job satisfaction. Items concerning police officers' job tasks covered frequency of conducting field searches of arrested persons, handcuffing suspects, impounding property, participating in raids, patrolling on foot, giving street directions, mediating family disputes, and engaging in school visits. The 1996 agency questionnaire gathered data on whether the police department had a COP program or a mission statement that emphasized community involvement, whether the COP program had an actual implementation date and a full-time supervisor, whether the respondents were currently assigned as COP officers, and whether the department's COP officers had had supplemental training
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
  • Travis, Lawrence F. III
  • Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor]
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Sanders, Beth A.
Label
Effects of Community Policing on Tasks of Street-Level Police Officers in Ohio, 1981 and 1996
Instantiates
Publication
Note
2481
Control code
ICPSR02481.v1
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institutions
Label
Effects of Community Policing on Tasks of Street-Level Police Officers in Ohio, 1981 and 1996
Publication
Note
2481
Control code
ICPSR02481.v1
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institutions

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